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Need College Money?

College Scholarship Offers for ALL U.S. and International Students

2016 Summer Community Service and Internship Opportunities

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Volunteering and interning provide real world and career experiences while igniting passions, allowing unique talents to be discovered, and developing effective skills that will allow success in the workplace while contributing to the community.

Volunteering and interning are wonderful ways to meet others, learn more about the community, and give back to strengthen the place we call home.

Volunteer Opportunities

www.volunteermatch.org

www.unitedway.org

High School Student Internship Opportunities

www.internships.com/summerinternships/high-school-students

www.discoveryinternships.com/

www.summerprogramfinder.com

http://collegeexplorations.blogspot.com/2015/11/2016-summer-internships-for-high-school.html

College Student Internship Opportunities

www.internships.com/summerinternships/college-students 

www.summerinternships.com/

www.internmatch.com/s/summer-internships

www.experience.com/entry-level-jobs/internships/

Click here for 

Community Service Planning and Documentation

Community Service Scholarships Start at Five Years of Age!

The Fair Labor Standards Act sets forth the following six criteria for an unpaid internship to be legal:

  1. The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training, which would be given, in an educational environment.
  2. The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern.
  3. The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff.
  4. The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded.
  5. The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship.
  6. The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.
Disclaimer:  The author and publisher make no representation or warranties to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this offer.  Furthermore, the author and publisher make no representation or warranties that the applicant will obtain financial assistance.  Please view the offer’s offsite homepage for full details.
Certain portions of the Edudaris® content may indicate to you your likelihood of winning a scholarship, gaining admission to a particular college or university, and/or gaining another opportunity posted by the offers. Such services are intended to be for directional purposes only and should not be relied upon exclusively in your college, scholarships, and opportunity search process of the offers on Edudaris®. No representation or warranties are given that the user will obtain financial assistance or be admitted to the college/university/school of their choice. Any advice, methods, recommendations, and tools given verbally, through the videos, and assignments on the Path to Scholarships® courses are solely the opinion of the authors and should not be interpreted as exhaustive.  
Our listing of scholarships is not exhaustive. We encourage students to also look for scholarships at their high school, colleges, community, churches, clubs, scholarship books, Internet search engines, and other scholarship websites. We never promise that a student will win a scholarship, but if they follow the five steps by completing the FREE online Five-Step e-Course they can build a strong foundation to highly increase their chances of winning scholarships. 

Community Service Ideas for Younger Students to Receive Recognition & Scholarships

Younger students, starting at five years of age, both urban and rural can have a great impact on a community and can receive recognition and scholarship awards. They can participate in classroom and school community service projects and/or projects from home, which can contribute to classroom and/or school community service projects.
 
Other ideas include:
  • Volunteer at a Special Olympics event – http://www.specialolympics.org/program_locator.aspx
  • DoSomething.org for ages 13-18 new activities regularlyglobe-304586_1280
  • Support active duty U.S. servicemen and women – Operation Gratitude or Operation Troop Support cards, care packages, and letters
  • Serve the elderly: manicures, play games, read, write letters, walk and talk, deliver a meal
  • Protect the environment: recycling campaign (cans, paper, plastic, ink cartridges, phone books,  greeting cards, Christmas trees, etc.) beach cleanups, park cleanups, plant trees, plant a neighborhood garden, (Ask for municipal permission)
  • VolunteerMatch.org – Matches your interests to your zip code with available community service projects
  • Children’s Hospital – Visit sick children, make cards/posters, read, play games, collect books/toys to take, host a walk-a-thon/fundraiser to raise awareness of a disease/fight a disease
  • Animals – Clean animal cages at a shelter, take photos to promote animal adoptions, raise a guide dog for the blind, host a walk-a-thon/fundraiser to protect endangered species
  • Story and/or Game Time  – Read and/or play games at clinics, hospitals, homeless shelters, daycares, HeadStart programs, and retirement homes, assisted living care 
  • Arts – Perform for senior centers, shelters, day care programs, local parks, or recreation centers (theatrical skits, musical revues, magic shows, or concerts) Make a movie to show
  • Sports – Volunteer at a YMCA/YWCA, Elks, Kiwanis, Rotary, or Lions Club, city parks, and neighborhood programs to help young athletes
  • Student-Watch Program – Local police department & principal – student patrol against theft and graffiti, educate other students about dealing with strangers, staying safe on the Internet, or avoiding drugs
  • Helping the needy – school campaigns to collect (food, clothing, books, toys, school supplies, eye glasses, toiletries, backpacks, or holiday gifts), sort donations at a local non-profit organization
  • Tutoring and Mentoring Young children – Tutoring and helping with homework, playing games

Educators can get involved (classroom projects and/or after-school programs):

What is Community Service? Planning and Documentation

Community service is the first step in helping others and documentation is required to be able to successfully apply to college and for scholarships.
 
Community service is investing time in the community through many different activities as a volunteer. Such volunteering can include service in a local hospital, nursing home, Red Cross, clinic, community projects, Teen Court, mentoring, neighborhood cleanups, youth work, coaching youth teams, tutoring, reading to younger children, and countless other possibilities.
 

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How Can Students Benefit from Doing Community Service?

Community service can change young people, helping them find a purpose, plan and a direction in life and helping them see life from a totally different perspective. Volunteering in the community gives students much to share in a winning scholarship essay as they relate real-life stories, characters, events, dates, and personal experiences which have built character and changed them and those around them buy priligy online. “It is not about me anymore, but making a difference for others in the direction I follow for my life.” A young person finds something that brings true meaning and satisfaction. With the impact of community service, combined with writing down ideas, goals, and dreams, a momentum begins that sets in motion the purpose and passion that drives a student to a life-calling, not only a career.
 
Community service is defined as investing time and serving others outside the family as a volunteer. Community service allows us to develop character, build self-esteem, and instills a life-long lesson of how to give back, while allowing us an opportunity to explore possibilities that may lead to future careers. A majority of scholarships require community service. However, community service scholarships exist as a category all on their own. Young children as young as five years of age can begin applying to community service-based scholarships! Documentation is crucial.

 

Research Career Interests Before Planning Community Service

  • U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics is a source for career information! This website covers hundreds of occupations and describes: What They Do, Work Environment, How to Become One, and more. Each profile also includes BLS employment projections for the 2010-20 decade.  http://www.bls.gov/ooh
  • U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration search tool, My Next Move; What do you want to do for a living? Search for careers with key words, browse careers by industry, and/or answer questions about the type of work you might enjoy. http://www.mynextmove.org

Planning Community Service

After career exploration and research students should volunteer in career interest areas.
 
  • Some volunteer jobs available for students include: bilingual interpreter, neighborhood cleanups, tutoring, reading to younger children, collecting goods, youth work, coaching youth teams, mentoring, and countless other possibilities.
  • Record all community service and update regularly.
  • Complete no less than a minimum of one hour per month. Set a goal for at least an hour per week or more.

Community Service Needs to be Documented in the Following Manner: 

  1. Person/Group/Organization
  2. Brief description of activity (2-3 sentences)
  3. Date and hours served
  4. Signature and telephone of a supervisor (Non-family members only)                                             

Community Service is About Quality of Service Over Quantity of Hours

Show a commitment over time, with a minimum of one hour per month over four months. If you can serve more, that is even better. Get involved with helping others. Most scholarships require community service. Be sure to document your time.

 

Community Service Scholarships Want to Know the Following Information:

1.  What was your commitment over time? (Hours: daily, weekly, monthly)
2.  What difference did you make?
3.  What leadership role did you have?
4.  Were you a role model?
5.  How did community service make you feel? 
 
Some community service scholarships provide certificates and recognition of accomplishment instead of money. These awards can be added to the student’s list of awards and recognition received.

Leadership and Community Service Make the Difference!

 

Demonstrating Leadership and Commitment to Community Service Can Make the Difference!

 
For a student with a lower GPA or one who is unable to demonstrate financial need, there are many scholarships based solely on community service, leadership and/or merit (GPA and/or SAT/ACT score). This is my answer to parents who say, “My child will never receive a scholarship because we make too much money,” or, “My child is not an honor student or a minority.” It is true that many scholarships and federal financial aid packages are need-based: calculated from the student’s and parents’ income from the previous year. That is why I cannot stress enough the importance of finding and applying to the scholarships for which you qualify.
 
Many students know that their family income will not qualify them for financial need-based scholarships or federal financial aid. They need to begin immediately establishing the foundations (as addressed in the workbook) for the profile that would qualify them for a community service, leadership, faith-based, and/or merit-based scholarship. 

High School Student Leadership: How to Stand Out in Your College Applications  http://bit.ly/1708mLQ 

Information about Local Community Service Opportunities

Where Can a Student Find Information about Local Community Service Opportunities? 

Students can find information about local community service opportunities from their school counselor, advisors, club sponsors, coaches, teachers, parents, pastors, cable television station, newspaper, radio and the Internet. Go to www.VolunteerMatch.org to learn more about community service opportunities in your community by inputting your zip code.


Where and How Can a Student Participate in Community Service?

Students can begin community service right in their own neighborhoods where they live, in their church and the school they attend. Volunteers are needed at the public library, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, elementary, middle, high schools, Girls and Boys Clubs, Habitat for Humanity, Special Olympics, children and adult day care centers, recreation centers, sports complexes, sports teams, Salvation Army, Red Cross, Meals on Wheels, homeless shelters, Teen Court, school service clubs, Big Brothers and Big Sisters organization, and animal shelters. Some volunteer jobs that may be available for students: a youth sports coach, bilingual interpreter, adopt a grandparent, collecting food, gifts, and personal care items for the holidays, sorting, packing, and/or delivering food boxes for the holidays, preparing and serving food, sorting donations for a non-profit organization, tutoring elementary or middle school students, caring for children, planning recreational activities, serving as a camp counselor, serving as a short-term missionary in another country, working as a mentor or an animal trainer.
 
Other activities like visiting elderly shut-ins, preparing meals for shelters and/or shut-ins, host or participate in drives (clothing, food, diapers, etc.), perform for the community, clean (street, highway, neighborhood, park, school, etc.) tutor, volunteer at a food pantry, animal shelter, or perform yard work for neighbors in need, are great ways to impact the community.
 

How Does a Student Document Community Service?

Community service hours need to be recorded accurately with a brief description of the activity, the date of service, and the signature and telephone number of the person supervising. Students may not perform community service for the family nor may family members sign off on community service hours.

Scholarships Starting at 5 Years of Age!

Community service and leadership opportunities begin as young as five years of age

Community service and documentation are vital to a majority of colleges and scholarships.

Community Service and Leadership 

Elementary school class outside

View the list of scholarship and award opportunities.

Action for Nature, January 31, Ages 8 – 16 http://actionfornature.org/ecohero_awards.aspx

Kohl’s Kids Who Care, February 1 – March 15, Ages 6 – 18 http://www.kohlscorporation.com/CommunityRelations/scholarship/index.asp

Jesse Brown Memorial Youth Scholarship, February 27, Ages 21 and younger                                   http://www.dav.org/help-dav/volunteer/jesse-brown-scholarship/

National Caring Award, Jan 1 – March 1, Ages 9 – 99 http://www.caringinstitute.org/caringawards.html

The Do Something Awards, October 1 – March 1, Ages 5 – 25 https://www.dosomething.org

Do Something Scholarships Ages 5-25 https://www.dosomething.org/about/easy-scholarships

Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America Awards, October 1 – March 1, Ages 13 – 18, http://fcclainc.org/programs/  and  http://fcclainc.org/programs/leadership-service-in-action.php

Youth Action Net Award, February 1 – March 8, Ages 18 – 29 http://youthactionnet.org/index.php?fuse=apply

The Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes, January 1 – April 30, Ages 8 – 18 http://www.barronprize.org/how-apply

The Prudential Spirit of Community Award, Sept. 1 – Nov. 3, Grades 5th – 12th http://spirit.prudential.com/view/page

Heroes of the Heart Gee Whiz Kids Award, Sept. 15 – Dec. 1, Ages 5 – 12            https://theheartofamerica.wufoo.com/forms/gee-whiz-kids-award/

Sodexo Foundation Stephen J. Brady STOP Hunger Scholarships, October 5 – December 5,  Ages 5 – 25  http://sodexofoundation.org/hunger_us/scholarships/scholarships.asp

The Heart of America Christopher Reeve Award, Oct. 1 – Dec. 15, Ages 13 – 18 https://theheartofamerica.wufoo.com/forms/the-christopher-reeve-service-award/

Do a Good Deed Contest (weekly), Ongoing (Win a computer!), Ages 5 – 18 http://www.doagooddeed.com/


Award Recognition Certificates Only

The President’s Volunteer Service Award, Ongoing, Ages 5 – 99  http://www.presidentialserviceawards.gov/

The Congressional Award, Ongoing, Ages 14 – 23 http://congressionalaward.org/program/

The Jefferson Awards for Public Service, Ongoing, Grades 9th – 12th http://www.jeffersonawards.org/nominations/

PBS Zoom into Action, Ongoing, Ages 5 – 18 http://pbskids.org/zoom/activities/action/

Disclaimer:  The author and publisher make no representation or warranties to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this offer.  Furthermore, the author and publisher make no representation or warranties that the applicant will obtain financial assistance.  Please view the offer’s offsite homepage for full details.
Certain portions of the Edudaris® content may indicate to you your likelihood of winning a scholarship, gaining admission to a particular college or university, and/or gaining another opportunity posted by the offers. Such services are intended to be for directional purposes only and should not be relied upon exclusively in your college, scholarships, and opportunity search process of the offers on Edudaris®. No representation or warranties are given that the user will obtain financial assistance or be admitted to the college/university/school of their choice. Any advice, methods, recommendations, and tools given verbally, through the videos, and assignments on the Path to Scholarships® courses are solely the opinion of the authors and should not be interpreted as exhaustive.  
Our listing of scholarships is not exhaustive. We encourage students to also look for scholarships at their high school, colleges, community, churches, clubs, scholarship books, Internet search engines, and other scholarship websites. We never promise that a student will win a scholarship, but if they follow the five steps by completing the FREE online Five-Step e-Course they can build a strong foundation to highly increase their chances of winning scholarships.